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This is when AI’s top researchers think artificial general intelligence will be achieved

Agritech - Foodprocessing - Energy - Building - Healthcare - Industry & Supply Chain - Transport - User experience - AI - 2018/11/12

At the heart of the discipline of artificial intelligence is the idea that one day we’ll be able to build a machine that’s as smart as a human. Such a system is often referred to as an artificial general intelligence, or AGI, which is a name that distinguishes the concept from the broader field of study. It also makes it clear that true AI possesses intelligence that is both broad and adaptable. To date, we’ve built countless systems that are superhuman at specific tasks, but none that can match a rat when it comes to general brain power.

But despite the centrality of this idea to the field of AI, there’s little agreement among researchers as to when this feat might actually be achievable.

Researchers guess by 2099, there’s a 50 percent chance we’ll have built AGI

Of the 23 people Ford interviewed, only 18 answered, and of those, only two went on the record. Interestingly, those two individuals provided the most extreme answers: Ray Kurzweil, a futurist and director of engineering at Google, suggested that by 2029, there would be a 50 percent chance of AGI being built, and Rodney Brooks, roboticist and co-founder of iRobot, went for 2200. The rest of the guesses were scattered between these two extremes, with the average estimate being 2099 — 81 years from now.In a new book published this week titled Architects of Intelligence, writer and futurist Martin Ford interviewed 23 of the most prominent men and women who are working in AI today, including DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis, Google AI Chief Jeff Dean, and Stanford AI director Fei-Fei Li. In an informal survey, Ford asked each of them to guess by which year there will be at least a 50 percent chance of AGI being built.

In other words: AGI is a comfortable distance away, though you might live to see it happen.

Read full article on: The Verge

James Vincent - The Verge -

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